Motivation

 

Nowhere to Somewhere

Creation itself holds it’s own abstraction through purposeful will or from making sense of random events colliding. Working with scientists and researchers in scientific fields, McFarland’s work has gained a different perspective in understanding of how things are defined by the very processes that bring them into existence. Her practice begins with the processes of creating and develops in exploration of what unfolds. Her work considers not only the excitement of the chaotic act of creation, but also the resulting stillness of the aftermath. The more time we give to the art of looking,  the more clarity we can apply to the questions that open out in front of us. History and time move us back and forth in our understanding. We can only be where we are within the context of everything that has proceeded this moment.

Making art allows one to be still with things in a reflective process, allowing connections to develop, disappear, reappear and strengthen. The repetition of process reassures and defines the investigation, with small actions building into a bigger picture. The’ doing’ becomes charged with potential , causing a sequence of disturbances or impacts, a pencil dent, the crumpling of surfaces, pressed ink blots or blown glass. The archaeology of the mark or object, its material culture invites investigation and the desire to draw closer, to connect in understanding. Enquiry and process impacts in the art making and hopefully integrates the viewer and maker with the image..

Gillian McFarland '17

 

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